Roses are red…

Have a client who has had me putting floral embroidery on a lot of ready-made clothes lately. This is a rose design I’m making for her. I couldn’t find a built-in rose file in my embroidery software. It comes with so many pre-made designs that I am really surprised it didn’t have a basic rose. I found this embroidery design picture of a full rose and re-digitized it into the different parts, the rose head, the stems, and the leaves.


I liked the way the shadowing in the rose is created by the stitch design. The stitch type is a Satin Special. It’s used for pieces that are too wide for a satin stitch to look good or stitch out correctly. It creates one or two stitches across the width of the design and gives it those dimples.

This is how my rose came out. I did it with only one color to save some time embroidering it.

Rose bud

After creating the head of the rose, I took the vines off the original picture and played around with some different sized roses. I ended up adding more thorns and changing the leave directions to make it a bit more interesting.

Rose vine

I’m still not finished with the designs. I’ll probably make a separate, just vines, design so that way I can place some vines on the garment near or connecting two different designs.


Embroidery Digitizing is a VERY manual process

Most people think that they can just upload a graphic picture into some embroidery software and viola it’ll stitch out on an embroidery machine. NO. That’s actually very far from the truth what digitizing embroidery is. Essential digitizing embroidery is like tracing over an image with stitches. The software does a lot o the work. Back in the day when machine embroidery first started people had to manually punch every single needle hole to create the stitches. Modern day software figures out a lot for you. In this short video you see how I’m working on digitizing a very large logo. Basically tracing over the image with stitching. There is a lot more that I have to do to it than just lay down stitching. There is a lot of trial and error that I’ve gone though figuring out what kinds of settings do what and how what you see on the screen really looks on fabric. It’s a very complex process. Over the last four years I’ve taught myself embroidery digitizing because there are not a lot of options for learning how the pros do it. I’ve watched countless tutorials online with all kinds of software. I’ve read my embroidery software’s manual multiple times. I’ve learned a lot about digitizing but there is still so much out there I could learn and am looking to learn. Here’s is a tiny glimpse into what digitizing looks like. For those wondering I am using Bernina Embroidery Software v6.

TransAm Bird logo


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